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Category: ENG 221

ENG 221 QCQ #11: Rawls I

ENG 221 QCQ #11: Rawls I

Quote: “Existing societies are of course seldom well-ordered in this sense, for what is just and unjust is usually in dispute. Men disagree about which principles should define the basic terms of their association. Yet we may still say, despite this disagreement, that they each have a conception of justice. That is, they understand the need for, and they are prepared to affirm, a characteristic set of principles for assigning basic rights and duties and for determining what they take…

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ENG 221 QCQ #9: “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas”

ENG 221 QCQ #9: “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas”

Quote: “The place they go towards is a place even less imaginable to most of us than the city of happiness. I cannot describe it at all. It is possible that it does not exist. But they seem to know where they are going, the ones who walk away from Omelas” (4).   Comment: This passage is at the very end of the story, when the narrator describes the few in the city of Omelas who see the suffering child…

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ENG 221 QCQ #8: Mandragola Acts IV-V

ENG 221 QCQ #8: Mandragola Acts IV-V

Quote: Callimaco: …After sighing a little, she said: “Since your cunning, my husband’s stupidity, my mother’s foolishness, and the wickedness of my confessor have led me to do what I would never have done of myself, I’m ready to believe it was heaven’s will that it should all happen this way, and I don’t have it in me to reject what heaven wants me to accept. Therefore, I receiver you as lord, master, guide…” (56).   Comment: These lines from…

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ENG 221 QCQ #7: Mandragola Acts I-III

ENG 221 QCQ #7: Mandragola Acts I-III

Quote: Messer Nicia: (Muttering to himself) I’ve always done things your way; this I want you to do my way! If I could have known I wasn’t going to have any children, I would have done better to marry some peasant girl. (p.20-21)   Comment: This quote occurs after Callimaco talks with Messer Nicia about a supposed potion to help Messer Nicia’s wife Lucrezia get pregnant. Messer Nicia is instructed to go to his home and return with a urine…

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ENG 221 QCQ #6: Antigone pg. 35-62

ENG 221 QCQ #6: Antigone pg. 35-62

Quote: Creon: Then she has not been taken by this disease? Haemon: Her fellow-citizens in Thebes deny it. Creon: The city will tell me how I ought to rule it? Haemon: Do you hear how rash and young you sound? Creon: Should I rule this land for myself or for others? Haemon: This city does not belong to one man! Creon: Isn’t the city thought to be her ruler’s? Haemon: You’d be a good monarch for a desert. (40)  …

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ENG 221 QCQ #5: Antigone pg. 7-35

ENG 221 QCQ #5: Antigone pg. 7-35

Quote: Because it wasn’t Zeus who pronounced these things to me, nor did Justice, companion of the gods below, establish such laws for humanity. I would never think your pronouncements had such strength that, being mortal, they could override the unwritten, ever-lasting prescriptions of the gods, for those aren’t something recently made, but live forever, and no one knows when they first appeared. (l.459-468) (pg. 29)   Comment: These lines are said by Antigone after she has admitted to Creon…

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ENG 221 QCQ #3: Coates Part 1

ENG 221 QCQ #3: Coates Part 1

Quote: “We, the children, employed our darkest humor to cope. We stood in the alley where we shot basketballs through hollowed crates and cracked jokes on the boy whose mother wore him out with a beating in front of his entire fifth-grade class. We sat on the number five bus, headed downtown, laughing at some girl whose mother was known to reach for anything—cable wires, extension cords, pots, pans. We were laughing, but I know that we were afraid of…

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